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Lettuce Sandwich Recipe: Wait! Don’t Go!

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I wrote about My Grandmother’s Ravioli a few months back. It’s a show featuring Mo Rocca where he interviews sweet G-Ma’s for their prized recipes. This sandwich was inspired by an episode in New England about Lobster (of course) and oddly, lettuce sandwiches. Wait! Come back! They’re actually pretty tasty.

The original recipe which can be found here, uses white bread, iceberg lettuce, salt and pepper. We fancied ours up a bit using romaine. Also, we decided to chop the lettuce deli style + mayo + bread. If you have a good tomato, that’s a nice addition as well. That’s it. The crunch is oddly satisfying.

Ingredients:

1/4 Romaine lettuce heart, chopped small
2 pieces of bread of your liking
Mayo/veganaise to taste
Optional: Slice(s) of chopped tomato

Method:
Chopped ¼ Romaine hard into small, bite size pieces. Toast bread to your liking. Apply mayonaisse or veganaise to your liking. Add on lettuce. Close sandwich and enjoy simplicity.

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Tortilla Espanola Recipe

Tortilla Espanola

Tortilla Espanola

I love omelettes but wanted to try something a little different. I don’t normally watch Master Chef, the long running amateur cooking contest but one fortuitous bit I did catch was the making of a Tortilla Espanola. Despite the name, no tortilla is in it. It’s similar to an omelette but includes cooked potatoes inside. When done well it’s like a quiche without a crust. Originating in Spain, it always includes potatoes, eggs and onion but other ingredients can vary. My version uses spicy sausage. Additionally, rather than stovetop, I cooked it in the oven on a cast-iron pan.

Servings: 2
Cook Time: 30-35 minutes

3 eggs
1 spicy sausage, chopped bite size
1 potato, chopped small
1 oz bell pepper, chopped small
½ onion
Cheese to taste (suggested: sharp cheddar, parmesan or gruyere)
A couple of florets of broccoli chopped small
salt
pepper
cayenne
garlic

Method:
Preheat oven to 350 degrees. First, the potato, bell pepper and broccoli need to be cooked (as they won’t cook fully in the oven). Add a bit of oil to a pan, add seasoning, potato, bell pepper, onion and broccoli in. Cook on medium-low heat for 15-20 minutes till fully cooked. While this is cooking, crack the eggs in a bowl. Add a touch of milk. Add seasoning to your liking. Whip it well for a few minutes. Set aside. Oil cast-iron. When potatoes are done place in place in pan along with sausage and cheese. Spread them out evenly. Pour egg on top. Place in oven for ~5 minutes. Egg should be solid and browned on the edges. It’s should be easy to cut out a slice. Serve hot with bread and salsa.

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There are bagels and then there are bagels….

On a Tuesday, in a half-full subway car I was seated next to a scholarly, older Jewish man. As frequently occurs, a musician boarded to play a mariachi-style song in Spanish. My seatmate quipped “oh I was just thinking of that song”. I’d noticed the man early into the 30 minute subway ride because he ate not one but two poppy seed bagels….. with nothing on them. Normally this type behavior is a red flag indicating crazy guy but he seemed to enjoy them.

I carefully pointed out his egregious behavior and asked if he had any places to recommend. He paused and said “No not really. What you really need is a slight hardness to the crust but a soft inside. Don’t fall for those places that are basically selling bread with a hole in it. Also, look out for those selling poppy seed bagels with like four poppy seeds on them.” He then went on to make a solid point “New Yorkers have opinions on three things: Pizza, Chinese Foods and Bagels”. As I did a mental tally of the other things New Yorkers care about, I realized he had mentioned the three most important. With that he got off at his stop (Broadway-Lafayette).

The next day, I stopped by Bagel Factory in Park Slope to pick up a bountiful bagel. Hopefully this one meets his stringent criteria.

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Ma’s Creations: Quinoa Pulao Recipe

Quinoa Pilaf

Quinoa Pilaf


So Ma recently heard about quinoa from a friend. She pronounces the protein and iron rich food in the same way I did at first. “Qui-noa” rather than “KEEN-WAH”. I like the way she says it, so I haven’t corrected her just yet.

My favorite recipe using the grain/seed up until then was this breakfast porridge from Scott Jurek. Ma’s savory creation is a simple pulao that is tasty by itself or eaten with Indian dishes.

Ingredients:
12 oz quinoa
½ onion, chopped small
few ounces peas
10 or so curry leaves
salt
chili powder
cumin seeds

Method:
In a pan, caramelize onions for 7-9 minutes. Add in cumin seeds and allow to sputter till they darken (maybe 2 minutes). Add in quinoa, water and rest of ingredients. Cook until quinoa is plump and water is absorbed. (Around 20 minutes). Serve hot.

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12th Street Grocery: Mystery Meat Sandwich

The term mystery meat only has a negative connotation, evoking perhaps to American readers the sketchy stuff used in certain fast food chain tacos or perhaps school cafeteria meatloaf. I have here though, one positive spin on that term.

One of the classic things to get for New Yorkers on the go are bacon, egg and cheese (B.E.C) sandwiches from the corner bodegas. Oddly one of the local grocery stores has gotten into this game. The Jo, Brian and Joseph’s Key Food sells these sandwiches pre-made next to the rotisserie chickens. Throughout the week the deli’s offerings varied from BE.C to ham, egg and cheese to hamburgers. I don’t know if there was any type of schedule – the only consistency was that at night, the breakfast sandwiches were half price (from $3 to $1.50).

The long named grocer normally has a picture of the sandwich along with the description affixed via sticker. I finally gave in to temptation a few nights ago to pick one up only to find no description or picture. It was simply labeled “deli by count”. It was a mystery sandwich! Perhaps even more intriguing, a mystery meat sandwich? Most likely they simply ran out of labels but somehow this made the food adventure more appealing. If it was intentional, it was a clever marketing ploy. Or perhaps I’m just strange?

Mystery Meat

Mystery Meat

Why not market this to the local bars, of which there are 4 within a couple of blocks? Instead of pizza, check out a mystery meat sandwich? You know it’s coming from a grocery store and you know which meats in could be. I would totally check that out. How would you market mystery meat sandwiches? P.S, I got ham, egg and cheese.

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RoodonFood Reviews: Galil Bright Morning Cereal (Gluten Free, Vegan)

Bright Morning Cereal

Bright Morning Cereal

I have a ritual every couple of months of picking up tahini, pita and items like rosewater at Fertile Crescent, a Middle Eastern grocery. In a sea of primarily foods from that region there were several boxes of Galil Bright Morning, a product of Poland.

This Non-GMO product is both gluten free and vegan and perhaps most importantly has a chocolate hazelnut filling! It’s sort of like putting a touch of nutella in your breakfast cereal.

Bright Morning Cereal

Bright Morning Cereal

Unlike certain brands of GF cereals, these square pillow shaped bites aren’t rock hard. They have just the right amount of crunch (similar to Chex level crunch) probably because it’s made from rice flour – reminiscent of wafers. The filling is sweet but not cloyingly so. (It’s 10g sugar per serving). They’re fun to snack on by themselves. With the addition of milk needless to say, everything turns chocolaty. Mental note: these would be fun to try as part of a chex style mix. With any luck, we will buy out the rest of Fertile Crescent’s stock of Bright Morning. This cereal is highly recommended.

Bright Morning Cereal

Bright Morning Cereal

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Food Shows: My Grandma’s Ravioli (Cooking Channel)

As a regular viewer of CBS Sunday Morning I’m a big fan of Mo Rocca. He has a way of making interviewees comfortable by bringing them in on the joke. The comedian hosts several shows, but a personal favorite is My Grandma’s Ravioli on the Cooking Channel. Now in its 4th season, the show as the name implies, features Grandmas sharing their favorite recipes. We’ve seen Jamaican G-Ma’s creating jerk chicken, along with “jungle juice” which apparently has a secret ingredient that was intentionally never revealed (to keep people coming back).He also visited a retired Grandma who used to do party planning for foreign dignataries. Now based in Massachusetts, they made an elaborate lobster dinner.

Each episode culminates in a family cookout in the kitchen or backyard. It’s an appreciation of said Grandma, along with a celebration of traditions. Foods really do bring people together. If the heartwarming angle doesn’t work on you, it will definitely inspire you to cook food from around the world. While I never met my own Grandmothers, it makes me wish I had. Do you have any special recipes from your grandma? What’s your favorite?

My Grandma’s Ravioli airs Monday through Friday on the Cooking Channel at 4pm EST.

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