2 Comments

AVS Privilege Bakery Jewish Rye Bread

My general rule is whether on vacation or just on a food adventure in a different neighborhood, to always pickup a loaf of bread. Good bread is hard to come by.

During a recent visit to Brighton Beach and Sheepshead Bay, Brooklyn I came across the AVS Privilege Bakery. Their Jewish Rye bread made me cry tears of joy. It has the classic rye flavor and a perfect balance of crunchiness, softness and chewiness. White flour is the second ingredient so I assume that brings about the softness. I tried it in several ways including peanut butter and jelly, cold cuts, Amul cheese spread and jam with butter with only good outcomes. It was only $1.99 for a 1 pound loaf.

The bread does not have caraway seeds which was a surprise. In fact, the ingredient list is refreshingly short: rye flour, white flour, sourdough starter, yeast, salt and filtered water. I oftentimes buy breads from the regular grocery store which have 20+ ingredients including high fructose corn syrup etc. It’s also worth pointing out that there is no added sugar. I love this bread and hope they someday get nearby distribution.

They don’t seem to have an updated website as yet, but the address is below:

AVS Priviledge Bakery
2914 Coney Island Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11235
(347) 462-1777
Map

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2 comments on “AVS Privilege Bakery Jewish Rye Bread

  1. My love affair with Jewish Rye began in Lakewood NJ in the early 70s – Lakewood served as a winter resort for wealthy Jewish residents of the NY met area, and although not a big place, it had at least 5 Jewish bakeries – we lived there only 1 year, but I will always remember that those bakeries were so fanatical about the quality of their bread, that they would never try to sell a loaf as ‘fresh’ on day two – and all ‘day old’ loaves sold for 15cents!

    And for one of the world’s best breads!

    • Thanks for your comment. I sort of know that area actually. After reading your rye posts I was inspired to pick up a loaf of dark rye though this one was (you guessed it) made with white flour and not pure rye. Still delicious though.

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